Monday, October 10, 2011

Cranberries/ Our World

 Cranberries growing in a field

Today is Thanksgiving in Canada. We are celebrating Nature's autumn bounty so it seemed fitting that I post about harvesting cranberries.

Two weekends ago, my husband and I visited Johnston's Cranberry Marsh in Muskoka Lakes,  Ontario.

 A field of cranberries

If you are like me, you thought cranberries grow under water. Actually, farmers flood the fields to make them easier to harvest.

 Cranberries floating in water

Cranberries float because each berry has four chambers filled with air.

 Cranberry picker

Once the fields are flooded with water, this is the rig that the does the picking. You can click HERE to see the post I did last year that shows how it works.

The hopper

Harvested cranberries ware placed in the hopper. As the berries go up, vines and leaves are left behind.

The dryer

As the berries come down the other side, they dry and move inside to be sorted.

 Sorting table (I'm not sure what this is called, but that's what happens here)

This photo was taken through a glass window. Nobody was there when I took the photo, perhaps because it was  lunchtime.

Bagged and ready for sale 

Click HERE to see tons more photos about Our World.

53 comments:

Kate said...

There is more to cranberry sauce than I ever imagined! Great post with series of informative photos and info for Canadian Thanksgiving Day. Hope you celebrate and have wonderful fun and food!

DawnTreader said...

I don't think I've ever seen cranberries "live" (only as dried fruit and juice, jam etc).

Zosia said...

Perfect to go with the turkey.

see you there! said...

Happy Thanksgiving. What are you having with your cranberries?

Darla

eileeninmd said...

Happy Thanksgiving to you and your family! Very interesting post on the cranberries and harvesting. I learned something new, thanks for sharing your world.

Sandra said...

thanks for all the info, this is all new to me, since i am from the deep south and never seen fields of cranberries except on commercials on TV. i love cranberries, whole or canned or jellied or dryed and eaten like raisins.

Birdman said...

So what's for dinner today on Thanksgiving in Canada.

Cezar and Léia said...

Thanks for this interesting post and very complete reportage! :)
Léia

John "By Stargoose And Hanglands" said...

I can't say I'd ever given a thought to cranberries before - but I certainly will next time I have some saucewith my turkey. Thanks for educating me!

Judy said...

We have cranberry bogs north of us but never have visited them. This was all so interesting. Hope you're having a wonderful Thanksgiving.

TexWisGirl said...

that's neat. i've been to some bogs in Wisconsin but that was years ago as a kid. :)

Louis la Vache said...

Very interesting - and timely - post!

Halcyon said...

Cool! We had chocolate covered cranberries with our dessert last night. They probably didn't come from this farm though. But who knows! :)

aka Penelope said...

It is definitely news to me that cranberries have four chambers filled with air! Nature hides incredible secrets that curious people such as you discover and share. This Thanksgiving Day is an opportunity for me to express thanks to bloggers like you who reveal interesting details of places I can explore so easily from my chair. :)

La Principessa Errante said...

Fascinating. While I intellectually know about cranberry harvest, I have never actually seen a bog or the process. Thank you so much for the education.

Kathy said...

Great lesson on cranberries. I will remember that lengthy process when I enjoy them during our Thanksgiving!

Elisa said...

I love this post!
And the pictures of your cranberries are great!
Elisa, Argentina

RedPat said...

Perfect post for the day! Enjoy Thanksgiving on this wonderful day - can you believe this weather!?

Rose said...

I would love to see that operation in person...and I wonder did it smell good? When I go to the orchard, if the apples are in the cooler, I always have to go walk in and take a deep smell!

Jacob said...

Thank you for this post, EG. So very interesting. I think it was due to one of your posts awhile back that I first learned cranberries were grown and harvested in marshes.

I've been drinking lots of cranberry juice lately. They say it's especially good for really old people!

Rajesh said...

Wonderful set of images.

Tina´s PicStory said...

great serie :)

Carver said...

Happy Thanksgiving! Great shots from the cranberry farm. I saw a documentary once about a cranberry farm that was fascinating.

Sylvia K said...

I agree with Kate -- more to cranberry sauce than I ever knew!!! What a terrific and interesting post for the day, EG! I love it! And your photos are fantastic -- as always! Hope your week is off to a great start!

Sylvia

hannah said...

Floating them for the harvest.
What a clever wheeze.
Lovely post.

Cathy said...

Thanks for sharing that - all new to me. Don't think I've seen them grown down here and now I know why the men in the sdvertisment for Cranberry Juice are standing in what looks like a sea of red bobbibg berries!
Take care
Cathy

Gary said...

Can't have turkey without the cranberries!! Boom & Gary of the Vermilon River, Canada.

Jarart said...

That is a great story about cranberries! So glad you took us along on the tour!

Dutchbaby said...

Great post, packed with interesting information and beautiful images. Thanks!

Antonette said...

A very educational post! Thank you for providing us with all that wonderful info.

~Antonette

Gill - That British Woman said...

I agree very educational,

Gill

Cildemer said...

Such an interesting post with very nice shots!
Thanks for sharing;o)

***
Have a nice and happy Thanksgiving****

Ruth's Photo Blog said...

Thanks for the info,it was very interesting.

Al said...

Great post - I've never seen cranberries prepared for sale like this before.

Arija said...

A great post. I have only ever picked cranberries in the wild and never thought of them as a farm crop. Really god to see how it is done, Thanks.

Gillian Olson said...

Great shots, the harvesting of the cranberries is interesting.

Randy said...

Happy Thanksgiving. I hope you day was full of fun.

lotusleaf said...

I had always wondered how cranberries looked!

Lesley said...

It is an interesting process that one rarely thinks about! I often think I should make the effort to go up to Balla one day.... (my work doesn't take me that far north)

Yogi♪♪♪ said...

That's cool. Learned a thing or two.

George said...

Thanks for the photo sequence explaining the harvesting of cranberries. I really like cranberries and I'm happy to learn more about how they get to my table.

ladyfi said...

What a fascinating set of photos! Lovely.

ewok1993 said...

Happy happy Thanksgiving. Gobble gobble.

ewok1993 said...

Happy happy Thanksgiving. Gobble gobble.

Sallie (FullTime-Life) said...

What a perfect Thanksgiving post! (And I hope your Holiday was wonderful.) There are some cranberry bogs on the Oregon Coast but I have never heard all of that information. Thanks for sharing -- and your pictures were great..

Ann said...

I was very curious too until I read their information.

Ebie said...

Actually I never knew that they grow on trees. I saw the commercial and the cranberries were floating in water.

Red Nomad OZ said...

Like several others, I've never seen a fresh cranberry ... and I still haven't! But your photos bring them one step closer!!

Kateri said...

That is very interesting. I thought they normall grew in standing water as well. But I do know that they do just fine in normal garden soil, because I have a half dozen plants in my garden. The whole process of harvesting and cleaning is so interesting. Thanks for sharing!

Luna Miranda said...

so this is what cranberries look like!:p i've tasted cranberry sauce but never seen the tree or the fruit in person. thanks for the introduction.:p

Small City Scenes said...

Really neat pics and info, EG. I am glad you went. MB

Reader Wil said...

Happy belated Thanksgiving! I love cranberries and eat them every day. Your posts shows how they are harvested and made ready for consumption.I think this is very interesting. Thanks!

Jackie said...

I never knew that, about floating them on water for harvesting, how novel, we learn something new every day. Over here we have to buy them frozen in plastic bags or as tinned jelly or sauce, I don't think they can grow them here at all.

Friends who encourage me

Blog Archive

About Me

My photo
East Gwillimbury is a rural town less than an hour north of Toronto, Canada's largest city. My family calls me CameraGirl because I take my camera with me wherever I go.