Monday, June 28, 2010

Lock 20/ My World

Tour boat out of Peterborough, Ontario

The tour boat is returning home, entering Lock 20  at Ashburnham on the Trent-Severn Waterway.  It's early evening and the tourists have just been to the highest lift lock in the world, which is less than a kilometre north of this lock. The water in the canal on this side of the lock is approximately 3.7 metres (12 feet) higher than the water in Little Lake just ahead.  So the boat must enter the lock to be lowered. Then the gates close behind it.

Water drains from the lock, lowering the boat

In the left-hand corner you can see the very back of the tour boat. The back gates to the lock have closed and some water has already been drained from the lock.

Nearly 3.7 metres (12 feet) of water inside the lock has now drained out of the lock

The boat will soon sail into Little Lake.

 
 Opening the gates in front of the boat

As this Government of Canada employee pushes this lever as he walks around, the lock gates in front of the boat slowly open...

Little Lake

and the tour boat motors on.






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39 comments:

Sylvia K said...

Marvelous post for the day! I'm always fascinated by the locks -- we a very large set of them here in Ballard (Seattle). Love your photos as always, beautiful captures, lovely colors and reflections! Hope your week is off to a great start!

Sylvia

Rose said...

So many things like these amaze me. When I talk to Roger about the things done by man...and how they accomplish them he always says, well, just think about the first Eskimo that said lets get in our little 'boat' and go spear a whale--not his exact terms but you get what I mean.

cieldequimper said...

Super! And that first shot has a wonderful reflection too!

And here was me thinking you were posting from the Big Muddy!

Dimple said...

Great shots, especially the last. It's wonderful that some things, like opening the gate to this lock, are still done by human power instead of big machines and computers.

The Early Birder said...

Using a natural resource and a little elbow grease to lift or drop a few tons...nice series. FAB.

Carver said...

I enjoyed this post so much and the reflection in the first shot was great.

Tammie Lee said...

that is an interesting post and fun to see.

Birgitta "foto CHIP" said...

Wonderful shots! First I thought it was from Sweden and our Gota Channel ;)

http://foto.rudenius.se/post/2010/06/28/My-World.aspx

Craver Vii said...

Boat locks are remarkable inventions. So is that boat... how does it not topple over with all those people up so high?

Riet said...

Great pictures. In our country we have many boatlocks. When we had our sailingboat we had to use them a lot. It was always fun to stay in them for a while and see all the boats come in. I have never seen one that is still working by manpower.

noel said...

aloha,

those are pretty steamer and lock, thanks for sharing these

Tracy said...

Now that is very interesting. I think I might like to be the one who opens the gate.

Bonnie Bonsai said...

Excellent with clear reflection down the water. This boat reminds me of home.

My World

Jacob said...

This a wonderful series. That first shot is stunning...what a grand reflection. The water looks like glass!

Carolyn Ford said...

Wow, the reflections in the top photo are marvelous! Working the locks seems quite complicated, but, they have been around for quite some time...It is fascinating to see boats or ships pass through them. Very nice photos!

This Is My Blog - fishing guy said...

EG: Neat captures of the little boat trip. I was at a old lock on the old Erie Canal this past week.

Jenn Jilks said...

I love watching boats through the locks. Just wonderful, EG. My world !

Ebie said...

I want to experience the tour, and see first hand how the locks operate.

Your photos really tell a story! Very interesting post.

Ann said...

I always wonder how locks work. Thanks for your photo number two. I was in locks in Australia but did get such a good photo as yours.

Regina said...

Fascinating place and such beautiful captures!

Evelyn said...

Really pretty world. Love the pics. Great reflection in the first.

B SQUARED said...

I am so fascinated by locks. Love visiting the Soo. Just amazing.

Indrani said...

Great pics with the post. I liked the shot of the man at work.

ladyfi said...

What a peaceful way to travel. Love that last photo - the boat looks so charming.

Luna Miranda said...

locks are amazing, an engineering marvel. fabulous photos as always.

Self Sagacity said...

I've been through a lock in London, quite interesting regarding the water highs and lows. Wonderful post.

Cezar and Léia said...

It's so interesting, thanks a lot for all information and these pictures are wonderful.The first one has a beautiful reflection!
hugs
Léia

paul said...

Nice description and great shots. Thanks and best wishes.

Robin said...

What a stunning reflection in that first shot - just like a mirror. Gorgeous!

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see you there! said...

I'd love to take that boat ride. Thanks for explaining how the locks work.

Darla

JOE TODD said...

Beautiful post. Really like the one photo with the reflections. My wife and I will be on the French River in late July we can hardly wait

The Gathering Place said...

You have some beautiful photos. I saw the picture of the old red barn on your other blog and it makes me really sad to see something like that traded for modern houses. I love the old country things!

Small City Scenes said...

Nice series of shots. Locks are very fascinating.
That is a very tall boat I hope it doesn't tip over. LOL MB

PS. The first shot is super. MB

George said...

Thanks for sharing these pictures of this part of your world. I think it would be exciting to sail on that boat through those locks. My children were fascinated by the locks near their grandparent's home.

wncmountainliving said...

It is amazing how these locks work! Great shots!

NatureFootstep said...

this is childhood memories to me. Had something similar where I lived at that time.

Andrée said...

If I can ever get into Canada again (so close yet so far away nowadays!), I'm going here. It's awesome!

http://meeyauw-pad.blogspot.com/2010/06/my-world-damselflies.html

ksdoolittle said...

Wonderful experience to show! We have a lock system linking the Atlantic Ocean to Bras d'Or Lake here in Cape Breton. Traveling through is fascinating. ~karen

Antjas said...

Haven't visited CDP sites in a while, but am glad I stopped at yours today. I spent many moments waiting for boats to go through this particular lock. The bridge would swing around and we would have to wait and wait for all those boats to go through. This was one of the main roads we would take to get to Keene from Peterborough. Thanks for the pictures. I will be visiting next week and will cross the bridge in your honour but hope I won't have to wait for any passing boats.

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East Gwillimbury is a rural town less than an hour north of Toronto, Canada's largest city. My family calls me CameraGirl because I take my camera with me wherever I go.