Wednesday, April 1, 2009

Log Cabin/ Sepia Scenes

Log cabin at the Whitchurch-Stouffville Museum

It boggles my mind that families once lived in such small spaces. What would pioneers think now to see the many HUGE homes some people live in today? Most garages are bigger than this log cabin!

To view other Sepia Scenes visit MaryT, theTeach at http://sepiascenes.blogspot.com

42 comments:

cieldequimper said...

Lovely cabin. Is it just me or can I see some blue there?

Betsy from Tennessee said...

Absolutely beautiful sepia scene, EG. It does make you wonder how people lived in such tiny spaces--but they did. When we drive back in the country here in TN, we always see lots and lots of trailer homes.. I asked George what people used to live in before those trailers. He said they lived in tiny, little square houses--like the one you pictured. However, most of the little tiny houses here look like shacks to me. I love the little log home you pictured. NEAT.
Hugs,
Betsy

Rose said...

You and me both about the whole families living in such small spaces. Can you imagine--no where to go for a moment to call your own. No privacy ever.
BTW, I do really like this picture. Your comment just got me started on something I often wonder about.

Small City Scenes said...

Great log cabin. You are right it is so small and it makes you wonder how large the family who lived there was.
When we were first married we lived in a one bedroom house and then proceeded to have 4 children before we finally added onto the house instead of the family. LOL
MB

Tricia said...

I love your sepia pics - You really know how to apply sepia! Love it!

WillThink4Wine said...

That is a fabulous cabin! I want one!

After my divorce I moved into a 400 sq ft cottage. I lived there for 12 years and absolutely loved it! I sold my business, moved from Florida and bought a much larger house in Georgia. After 3 years, I can tell you in all honesty that I miss my little cottage a great deal!

Jacob said...

Wonderful photo...and you're right; our houses today would probably seem obscene to our forefathers and foremothers!

kaye said...

that's nice, I'd forgotten about sepia scenes this week

Jarart said...

So pretty, I could live in that log cabin and be very happy.

Lew said...

Beautiful shot! Those old wooden buildings really do show off well in sepia (and b&w). You are colder than us. It's just that by now we expect 60's and 70's, but have 30's and 40's recently and I though I'd play on the coolness for April first.

Mojo said...

Oh that is just about perfect! Well played indeed!

Gill - That British Woman said...

I would love to live in that cabin, no idea where I would put all my stuff though!!!

We're moving to Hwy 89/Airport Road area, so not too far from you guys......

Gill

Robin said...

They were probably darn glad to have it come winter time too.

So many things that are really luxuries that we've all convinced ourselves we couldn't possibly live without...

maryt/theteach said...

Marvelous diverse sepia coloring, EG! I love it! Happy Sepia SCenes! :)

RuneE said...

I have a feelin that I would have preferred this log cabin to many garages :-)

However, with a bit of brushing up it would make a very nice holiday cabin.

PS Thank you for the comments!

PERBS said...

I like the cabin also. I would imagine people living in it were outdoors for a good part of the day. All they needed wa a place to cook and sleep. Probably had outdoor "facilities" and a portable tub for baths. I could live in a little cabin in the woods IF it had indoor plumbing.

ilanadavita said...

Great cabin. As a child I dreamt to live in one of those; somehow I no longer do unless it is perfectly insulated.

Old Wom Tigley said...

I'd move in right now.. it's beautiful.

Tom

Wiggers World

ewok1993 said...

stunning in sepia. i wonder if this is still in use. i would really love to have a cabin in the woods someday, somewhere i could go to recharge.

Jana said...

Great photo!

Ralph said...

This simple abode looks so nice. I would say it has a functional beauty. The logs showcase a more rugged era, where you first had to chop trees down for logs...not have the lumber yard deliver the lumber to the site (no axes required today). Sepia adds age to the structure, almost looks like we are there in the correct period...

VALKYRIEN said...

Those old houses really look at their best in sepia! Well done!

Terri said...

Excellent choice for sepia. I'd love to know the story of that cabin. And yes, what would they think of our McMansions?? That kind of dwelling has a seductive simplicity to it.

George said...

What a beautiful sepia photo. Some of the cabins we see here in Tennessee are also smaller than our garage. It does boggle the mind.

Patti said...

Lovely sepia scene. They did live in small spaces, didn't they? Our house is small, but not that small.

To answer your question about our cats, I happened to catch them sitting next to each other (posed) like that. But they do get along well!

Jeri said...

Beautiful cozy little cabin! And yes we are all spoiled these days, our ancestors would be amazed if they could see the way we live.

dot said...

They would probably think we are very wasteful. Beautiful little cabin and sepia scene!

Glennis said...

Great old cabin, and I also am amazed to think the families that lived in this cabin probably had 12 children that they nurtured and raised within those walls. Must of been standing room only!
Now days we all live in far too larger homes with frequently only 1 or 2 children.

Denise said...

These sepia toned photographs are great and love this one of the log cabin. I guess it's all relative, what you're not used to you don't miss, in the way of space I mean.

Barbara said...

Two words.... Love it....
Smiles B

judi said...

Cozy at the least!

Gallery Juana - ギャラリー ワナ said...

Beautiful shot of a lovely cabin.

napaboaniya said...

Looks lovely in sepia. The cabin looks like a great place to retreat from the stressful city area as well.

Abe Lincoln said...

All of those people from those times would find it mind boggling to try and visualize the cost of modern homes. I just saw people on House Hunters looking at 3 homes. 1.8 million; 1.3 million and 1.7 million. They chose the 1.3 million. I can't even begin to estimate what the monthly payments are. I am certain, the way the couple whined, they wouldn't step foot in this cabin. Too bad for them. That is the way life was for every living soul in this country. I guess we have moved beyond it.

Karen ~Georgia Angel said...

I love the log cabin. thanks for sharing & thanks for visiting my blog.

see you there! said...

Darling cabin.

Living that life looks hard from this vantage point but the family who lived there was no doubt grateful to have it.

Darla

Deb said...

excellent use of sepia, love log cabins

Quiet Paths said...

Amazing isn't it? Your shot really brings out that other way back when feel too. I always marvel at where my Mom grew up; two rooms plus the mud room. She slept on the couch in the living space.

sunnymama said...

Such a beautiful, moody building in sepia. There is so much detail in this picture. I love it all.

PJ said...

It is hard to imagine what kinds of living conditions most people live in. That is a small home. but it was home and I suppose that's what mattered.

Kahshe Cottager said...

This is an outstanding sepia scene! I love the old buildings done this way especially because the details are so pronounced. I wonder too what our previous generations would think of our need for more and bigger - but then I think they had similar feelings too when they left their homelands to come to Canada.

Your Skywatch photo is amazing. I really think that your photos are getting even better than they were ... and they were always very good!

Mary said...

Lovely! Perfect sepia!

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East Gwillimbury is a rural town less than an hour north of Toronto, Canada's largest city. My family calls me CameraGirl because I take my camera with me wherever I go.