Wednesday, April 11, 2012

U/Alphabe-Thursday

 Mostly UNPAINTED

Many barns in Ontario are left unpainted, and it seems like every time I post a photo of one, someone wants to know why they are left that way.  Here's why: paint does not extend the life of a barn.  In fact, a poor formulation or application of paint can accelerate a barn's demise.

 Unpainted barns #2

Bare weathered wood is hard and often outlives that which is painted.

Unpainted and pigeons flying over

I am linking to Jenny Matlock at Alphabe-Thursday HERE

53 comments:

Jill said...

LOVE these. Thanks for explaining why so many are unpainted...I never knew!

Lowell said...

I didn't know that! I'd always heard that paint was a preservative. Perhaps if they'd try painting them and compare? :-)

Betty Roan said...

Maybe my Dad knew about that because our barn wasn't painted and it was still a great barn when the new owners tore it down to build a fancy cattle barn on that spot. Cool find!

Sandra said...

i prefer the weathered look over the painted. did not know why they did it, but also they have to be painted over andover and the paint peels. I love that second one. charming old barn.

see you there! said...

Interesting about the paint and wood. I love the look of the weatherd barns whatever the reason.

Darla

Kathy said...

i.e., one reason weathered barnwood is in such demand.

Nancy said...

I love unpainted barns and these are wonderful. Thanks for sharing the info behind painted vs unpainted. Interesting.

Gattina said...

Even unpainted they look so romantic to me !

Halcyon said...

I rather like the look of unpainted barns. They somehow fit into the landscape better. However, I didn't know there was an actual reason behind it! Thanks for teaching me something. :)

aka Penelope said...

Interesting about the not painting of barns. We have many very old and dilapidated barns in my area. The paint peeling badly off the wood makes for great photographs but (as you say) probably does nothing to help the barns survive.

TexWisGirl said...

makes for some wonderful wood tones. :)

Malyss said...

I had read that red painting was a way to protect wood against insects?.. Anyway, naked wood makes fantastic pictures!

Sinbad and I on the Loose said...

Did not know that about leaving the barn unpainted. So all this time its been a conspiracy of the paint manufacturers to "protect" our homes and buildings.

Lowell said...

Hi EG! Re your question about the Lime Cabinet: It's a gift shop which sells a variety of things including items for the home. They also sell scarves, purses, jewelry, etc.

Jarart said...

That was an interesting lesson in wood preservation. It's good because I think the unpainted barn is beautiful just the way it is.

Paul in Powell River said...

I certainly like the look of # 2!

Craver Vii said...

Funny now the brain works... I thought I read: "Unpainted pigeons flying over." Yes, pigeons last longer when they're unpainted too. (lol)

cieldequimper said...

I didn't know. But I do love the weathered wood!

VP said...

I can always appreciate unpainted wood, old and noble, but never the pigeons flying over it...

jabblog said...

I didn't know that - very interesting.

NixBlog said...

Great photos of these barns. Perhaps a scientific experiment is called for. Pain one barn and leave one unpainted next door to see which lasts longer :-)

PS: Yes, the most dramatic weather in Melbourne is in Summer (December-February). Winters are generally mild and unremarkable.

from my wicked ways to turning a phrase said...

I was always curious, thanks for sharing.

Tina´s PicStory said...

great shots! not unusual in u r blog :)

Donna Heber said...

Thanks for explaining why the barns are left unpainted because I was going to ask :-) Great post for Ms. Jenny's Alphabe-Thursday.

Rocky Mountain Woman said...

Thanks for the lovely photos, and the explanation. I'm going to use it as an excuse when people ask why I don't stain my house!

Mumsy¸.¤ยช“˜¨ said...

Didn't know that! I thought that paint would protect the wood better. Beautiful photos..

Sandy said...

I lived in Central Illinois for a few years and there were corn fields and barns all around our town.. most were either red or unpainted.. well you just solved my thoughts on Why are they not painted...
thanks
good post
Sandy

taylorsoutback said...

Many barns here in Wisconsin are also unpainted - the ones that are the classic "barn red" really stand out!

Great photos!

NatureFootstep said...

this looks really old. :)

Lois Evensen said...

Very interesting. I've learned something new. :)

Vicki/Jake said...

NAKED BARNS! And awesome photos, I love old barns. Now I'll have a better understanding of them:)

George said...

Thanks for the explanation as to why the barns are left unpainted. I, for one, like the weathered look of the unpainted wood.

Erika said...

How fascinating! I do like the look of weathered barns--they just look like they have tons of stories to tell.

Betty (picture circa 1951) said...

Very interesting. I never knew that before. Very nice pictures.

edenhills said...

That is such an interesting tidbit. You never see barns that aren't painted around here, unless they are neglected.

Madge Bloom said...

Nicely spotted and captured...

Gillian Olson said...

I didn't know that, thanks.

mary said...

Even if the barn is not painted it's very pretty!

Letter U

Stephanie said...

I did not know that either. Love the shots though.

Randy said...

I like the touch of red in the first shot.

EllenaElizabeth said...

With a title of Unpainted Barns, I just had to look at your blog. The old timber barns in Australia are unpainted too. There was just not enough time or money to be painting barns. Often multiple farm outdwellings at that. The farm I grew up on had 2 heritage barns, both unpainted. Both built in the 1880's. I loved looking at your photos, thanks for sharing.

Chrissy Brand said...

Great photos of rural life and an intersting explanation re: the non-painting.

Chrissy from Manchester: a photo a day at Mancunian Wave

The Paw Relations said...

Great picture and an interesting post. Who'd have thought painting wood could excelerate it's decay.

Herding Cats

http://seathreepeeo.blogspot.com

Liz said...

Great shots!! I love all the barns from over your side of the world.

Coloring Outside the Lines said...

Nice pics- I didn't know about the paint- that's interesting.

Sue said...

I never knew this and always thought paint was protective outdoors.

Live and learn, eh? And they look cool. Rustic.

=)

JDaniel4's Mom said...

I didn't realize this about unpainted barns.

Lmkazmierczak said...

Love all the barnstorming, I mean brainstorming comments as well as your post♫♪

Rose said...

These are wonderful!

Judie said...

Love your barn photos! I have heard that peeling paint can trap water, causing the wood to rot. This is a very interesting post!

anitamombanita said...

These are terrific. In Chile, pretty much every barn is an unpainted barn...and I'm loving it!

Pondside said...

I miss those Ontario-style barns. In fact, the thing I miss most about Ontario is its rural life. These shots are beautiful.

Jenny said...

I love Unpainted barns...

I actually never knew that was the reason they were left Unpainted...

These photographs are so Unique!

Great post for the letter "U"!

Thanks for linking.

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East Gwillimbury is a rural town less than an hour north of Toronto, Canada's largest city. My family calls me CameraGirl because I take my camera with me wherever I go.