Monday, March 7, 2011

Sifto Salt Mine/ My World

Sifto Salt Mine, Goderich, Ontario

Sifto Salt Mine - the largest salt mine in the world - extends 13 square kilometres (5 square miles) under Lake Huron.  From it comes more than seven million tons of highway salt every year.  The mine is more than 152 metres (500 feet) underground.

Goderich, Ontario on Lake Huron

The mine was once part of a HUGE tropical sea that existed four hundred million years ago.

Another View of the Sifto Salt Mine

The salt bed was discovered in 1866 by a team hunting for oil and is North America's first recorded discovery of salt.

FYI: This same salt bed lies under Detroit, Michigan (U.S.A.)


Visit MY WORLD to see more photos from around the world.

63 comments:

Colleen said...

Very interesting. I just watched a show about the salt mines under Detroit, but they didn't mention the Ontario side.

see you there! said...

Interesting. Completely different than my mental image of a salt mine.

Darla

Minoru said...

Amazing. I knew mining of coal and oil. I found for the first time that you can mine salt.

Cezar and Léia said...

Wow it's really interesting , a salt mine!!!
Thanks for sharing your world, these pictures are wonderful!
Léia

texwisgirl said...

very interesting! would not have envisioned a salt mine looking like this!

Lois Evensen said...

Fascinating info.

Farmchick said...

Actually very interesting. I have never seen pictures of a salt mine.

Halcyon said...

Very interesting. I wonder if it's ever open to the public. Would love to tour a place like this.

stardust said...

This is one of the most interesting posts. When I had a trip to Salzburg (Austria), I learned “white gold” brought wealth to the area, but actually I had no idea of what “salt mine” is like. All the photos are clear and beautiful.

Small City Scenes said...

Well when some one says 'back to the salt mines' now we know!!
very interesting info. MB

Andy said...

Interesting photos and history. If this area was a tropical sea 400 million years ago perhaps what goes around comes around. Maybe this climate change thing is not so bad after all.

Ruth's Photo Blog said...

AS the saying goes,'you learn something new every day.' I did not know that salt was mined from under the water.Is this also the salt we buy for table use?

Jack said...

It is news to me. Of course there is salt in the water, but I didn't know it was mined underwater.

Jarart said...

Very interesting. This brings many questions to mind. I will have to see what I can find out on line.

SouthernSass said...

I never really thought about where salt came from - very interesting!

Paulie said...

Love reading about these historical tidbits! You have such interesting places to see and things to do!

Martha Z said...

It seems strange to have a salt mine under a fresh water lake, glad you explained the why.

ewok1993 said...

very interesting and informative. is this where north america gets its salt?

amatterofhowyouseeit.com said...

Hard to believe that was once a tropical sea!

Shirley said...

Interesting! I didn't realize we had a salt mine in Canada. There are probably more out there too.

RedPat said...

I have never seen pics of this before - Super shots. Also didn't know that the salt was under Detroit too.

Liza said...

Wonderful shots! Happy Ruby Tuesday.

My RUBY link.

Cafe au lait said...

Very interesting photos.

I played too. Mine are here and here.

Lorac said...

I wanted to take a tour there years ago but I heard they have stopped them. Imagine a tropical sea under there! Won't be long and we will be tropical again! Love your photos, you have been busy!

morememes said...

How interesting.
And quite attractive. Do they have salt sculptures down below?

Sylvia K said...

Terrific and interesting post as always! Great captures and I always enjoy the information you share with us! Have a wonderful week!

Sylvia

Jacob and Lois Anne said...

EG! Wow! Boy was I off on what this place was all about...I've heard of the salt under Detroit but not this mine. Quite fascinating and super photos! Can't imagine working there, though.

An impressive post?

Re your question on Stone Creek...I used a Canon S95 (the best point-and-shoot on the market!) for the shots...but the hawk let me get within about 30 feet. It was just too foggy to get a sharp photo and that was frustrating...

Kathy said...

My dad worked in salt mines in Louisiana prior to World War II. As you can imagine it is very hard on the skin. The Louisiana salt mines supplied the Confederate Army with salt during the American Civil War.

Kate said...

One of the perks of blogging is the information that's shared and how much one can learn. Never crossed my mind to wonder about the mining of salt.

Kay L. Davies said...

There used to be a punishment, being "sent to the salt mines" but I think that must have been a long time ago.
Very interesting. Had to laugh about the American TV show not mentioning Ontario, according to another commenter. Also laughed about road salt being called "Sifto" like table salt.
-- K

Kay, Alberta, Canada
An Unfittie's Guide to Adventurous Travel

Eve said...

Neat! I've never seen a salt mine before - and what an interesting history!

VP said...

I knew nothing about salt mining or salt beds. Very interesting pictures and information.

Leif Hagen said...

Who would have thunk?!

aka Penelope said...

The biggest such mine in the world? I had no idea. And now I know where the name “Sifto” comes from. Thanks for sharing this interesting tidbit of information about Ontario. Digging this deep for salt reminds me resources come to an end and it wouldn’t hurt cut down. :)

snowwhite said...

What a huge underground salt mine it is! Japan used to take salt from the sea warter and the salt was the source of wealth. Thank you for splendid information.
Great post!!

Mama Zen said...

That's amazing!

Janie said...

Fascinating that they can mine salt from under a modern day lake.

Al said...

Very interesting - I'm not sure I'd like to work in a mine under a lake.

George said...

Very interesting -- I enjoyed the pictures. There's also a salt mine under Lake Erie from Cleveland, Ohio.

Kim, USA said...

When I look at your photos I knew I am familiar of the surrounding. Then I read the captions and yes I have seen this and I couldn't believe when hubby told me that underneath Detroit is a salt mine. Very cool huh!
Ruby Tuesday

Indrani said...

This is interesting, never knew of this.

Catherine said...

interesting - who would have thought it!!

Yogi♪♪♪ said...

Very very cool. In the natural gas liquids industry we use salt caverns in Kansas, Texas and elsewhere to store our product.

Jama said...

I never knew they are salt mine, I've seen documentaries about harvesting salt from the sea, and they are done manually not big scale such as these.Amazing!

Genie said...

Well, you really gave me a history and science lesson tonight. This whole post is so very interesting. Bud and I are sitting here waging neither of us had a clue as how salt was mined. Always before when I thought mine, I thought underground - solid ground - not under water. That second shot is really good. This is certainly on emissive operation. Thanks for your continuing encouragement comments about my photography.

Rose said...

That would be an interesting place to visit...

ladyfi said...

What a fabulous location for a salt mine!

Randy said...

Very interest post indeed.

Randi said...

Very informative post and beautiful shots. Love the soft and bright colours.

Reader Wil said...

Salt is very important for us. This winter started with snow and ice.The roads were slippery and we were afraid that our salt supply was not sufficient to keep the traffic going.Your post is interesting and makes one think about the work in the mines. I never realised how hard this work must be!

Life Ramblings said...

this is something new to me. i've not seen a salt mine before. thanks for the snippets.

Titania said...

I remember, when I learnt in secondary school about the great lakes. I was so impressed. It was the time when Eisenhower was President and we learnt all about him as well! It seems a lifetime ago!(It is LOL)

lotusleaf said...

Interesting. I had not heard of a salt mine hidden under a lake. Salt is extractedm from sea water here.

Samson said...

interesting read, liked the photos too... hard to believe this was a tropical sea

Míriam Luiza said...

Informação interessante para mim que vivo deste lado! Obrigada! gostei da foto também!

Wren said...

That's intriguing. I don't know whether I'm more fascinated by the mine itself or the idea of a tropical sea in Canada. Not for global warning, but some days I would welcome a little more sunshine on the snow in March. It's overstaying its welcome.

Pat said...

Fascinating post! I had no idea there was salt mining going on in that area. I recall going on a tour of a salt mine just outside of Salzburg, Austria in 1970. Perhaps the salt there was left by an ancient sea also.

Gary said...

Apparently the underground equipment gets so corroded it literally falls apart. Great shot. Boom & Gary of the Vermilon River, Canada.

Francisca said...

You have me wondering what the processing is all about. Interesting post, EG.

NatureFootstep said...

did not know it was that large. .)

Viola said...

W
O
W
!!!

Huge salt mine!! And soooo deep!!
Great to see! :)

Viola said...

Oh.. I see!! So the salt mine was the surprise!! Situated on the other side of the river.. :))

Joyful said...

Wow. I didn't know such a place existed here in Canada. Are those buildings on land or sitting on top of water?

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East Gwillimbury is a rural town less than an hour north of Toronto, Canada's largest city. My family calls me CameraGirl because I take my camera with me wherever I go.