Monday, December 20, 2010

French Castle, Part 2/ My World

Overhanging dormers, top floor of French Castle, Old Fort Niagara, New York

This is more about the French Castle, which I posted about last week HERE.

French Castle

Reminder: The castle faces (on the opposite side of the building) the Niagara River and Canada. From 1726 to 1759, France controlled the Niagara River and therefore the major water route into the Great Lakes and the interior of North America.

Top floor window from the inside

The hole is for fitting muskets or swivel guns through.

Guard room, second floor

Beds on the left (which you cannot see) and benches here where approximately 20 soldiers ate and mingled.

Officers' Mess, second floor

There's room here for between three and five French army officers to eat and socialize.

Chapel

A chapel was an important feature in all 18th century French garrisons.


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34 comments:

Kathy said...

I love visiting these historic places through photos!

Cezar and Léia said...

I'm really envious here, I also would love to visit there! wow thanks for sharing your pictures!I love the first and the last shot, the chapel detail is adorable!
Hugs and a nice week
Léia

cieldequimper said...

Okay, the overhanging dormers are the New World version of Mansart windows (the guy who designed most of the palace and of the city)! I love these holes, we call them "meurtrières", I had never seen a wooden one before, most of the ones that have survived here are in strongholds that used to be as strong as the rocks they were made of.
I really like how everything looks "untouched". Does it smell musty in there or is there a beeswax smell?
This is really very interesting!

Farmchick said...

I love the ancient look of the first photograph. I can't imagine how cold it had to be in these castles.

Francisca said...

Interesting world, EG, but I wouldn't trade my life with the officers or soldiers who had to live there! I have yet to visit a castle or fort that gave me any sense of comfort.

Sylvia K said...

What a fascinating, historic place! Your photos are fantastic as always and definitely the next best thing to being there. Love the details that you've included, they make your wonderful post even better and so interesting! Have a wonderful week and wishing you a very, Merry and Joyous Christmas!

Sylvia

Jacob said...

I thought those holes were BIG keyholes!

This is a fascinating place...I think I'll put it on my "bucket list." But I'd better get going on some of those things 'cause I could kick the ol' bucket any time!

Re the castle...as I think I said before, it would appear to be a cold, damp, musty place to live...not that anyone's invited me to live there, but, still...

Small City Scenes said...

Great shots, EG. Thanks for showing these to us. I never know about this place. MB

flutietootie said...

Looks very interesting. I always wondered what it would have been like living long ago.

Martha Z said...

When these historic structures are furnished it makes is easier to imagine what life was like in the past and grateful to be able to enjoy some of our modern conveniences. If we take time to reflect we might even realize we don’t need them all.

Luna Miranda said...

i thought the holes are keyholes.:p a fascinating place...i love the stone walls.

Sally in WA said...

I enjoy these historic places. You've given us a great tour. :)

Rajesh said...

Wonderful shot of French castle. It has beautiful interiors.

Sistertex said...

Great photos, love seeing history...
thanks for sharing.

Joe Todd said...

Sure was a different world then. Appreciate the tour.

aka Penelope said...

The table looks inviting and colorfully set. The hanging jackets make the room seem very much alive.

Photo Cache said...

Very nice to take time and visit historical places.

Happy Christmas.

Randi said...

Very interesting post! What a beautiful fort. I love the limestone walls.

Starnitesky said...

Interesting castle to visit, I enjoyed your photos. Thanks for sharing.

NatureFootstep said...

I was wondering about taht upside down keyhole. :) But you gave the answer. :)

Wishing you a merry christmas!

Xavi said...

I wish you a Merry Christmas, Tina!!!!

Lesley said...

It looks so quaint now, but I bet was a tad uncomfortable for them.

marcia@joyismygoal said...

I wonder if i could survive a castle

Gary said...

More excellent photos of the Castle. Boom & Gary of The Vermilon River.

KB said...

I love those old buildings. Excellent shots.

ladyfi said...

Those wooden dormers are fabulous. Have a joyful Christmas!

BraCom (Bram) said...

Beautiful My World Tuesday posting

Merry Christmas and have a nice week,
Greetings, Bram

Link to My Word Tuesday post!

Seen on My World Tuesday

Reader Wil said...

This is all very interesting and awe inspiring thank you for showing this.

jabblog said...

What an interesting place. It's always fascinating to learn the history and to understand the different influences.

Sallie (FullTime-Life) said...

I love the pictures and the interesting history. My favorite way to learn. I hope we get to this area on our next road trip.

Frostbite and Sunburn said...

Thank you for a wonderful tour of some Canadian history. Great photos

lisaschaos said...

Oh I'm so happy you shared more. Love this building!

Crafty Green Poet said...

what a wonderful castle! Thanks for the tour!

Rose said...

I was telling Sarah about this the other day...so glad you showed more of it.

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East Gwillimbury is a rural town less than an hour north of Toronto, Canada's largest city. My family calls me CameraGirl because I take my camera with me wherever I go.