Monday, November 2, 2015

Logging Mural

 Mural on Parry Sound business next to bridge on the Seguin River

The town of Parry Sound owes its beginning to the logging industry as depicted in this mural. Parry Sound had several mills, one of which was situated on Georgian Bay at the mouth of the Seguin River, which provided power for the mill as well as water to float logs to the mill.

Logs neatly piled on a skid to be hauled away over snow by horses

During the 19th and early 20th centuries  trees were felled and piled onto skids from September until the the snow got too deep. For the rest of the winter, logs were hauled out of the woods to frozen lakes and rivers.

The horses 

Once the ice thawed, the logs were pushed and rolled into the water to be driven driven to sawmills, each log marked with the name of the company whose workers had cut them down.

Logs moving over water

At each mill, logs were cut into boards then piled on docks to dry and to wait for ships to take the lumber to such cities as Toronto, Cleveland and Detroit.

I am joining Monday Mural HERE

More photos from Our World can be seen by clicking HERE.

50 comments:

Margaret Adamson said...

This is a fantatic mural so detailed. A work of art. Thanks for sharing.

Francisco Manuel Carrajola Oliveira said...

Um belo mural uma verdadeira obra de arte.
Um abraço e boa semana.

Kathy said...

This mural has a great visual perspective. The stack of logs seem to be actually sitting in front six the picture.

Lowell said...

What an interesting post! And the mural is superb. I love the artistry!

Shammickite said...

This is really three dimensional, I like it. Nice description of the logging business too. I'm a lumberjack and I'm OK, I sleep all night and I work all day....

The Furry Gnome said...

Quite the mural! How would they ever get them piled so high?

PerthDailyPhoto said...

Brilliant! I do like a mural that has historical content, super find EG.

José Mendonça said...

So well done! Great find.

Sandra said...

logging was hard work and dangerous to... i like this mural, and i hope they did not pile those log that high in real life..

Jeevan said...

Very interesting process with logs and the mural depicted it so well! Thanks for the captures in detail

Amazing

Jackie Mc Guinness said...

This is stunning!!

Darla said...

Amazing work of art. Imagine the time it took to paint it.

John @ Sinbad and I on the Loose said...

That seems like a lot of logs for just two horses to move but I guess the icy snow made it manageable.

LOLfromPasa said...

That is so grand. Wonderful history lesson not to be forgotten.

Mary Hone said...

Someone did a great job with that. Very cool.

Debbie said...

murals are the best...so much better than a plan concrete wall!!! this one is really beautiful!!

b.."E"..th said...

love all those details ( ; very very cool!!!

VP said...

Original and stunning!

Tom said...

A neat history lesson.

Christine said...

Fab mural! The logging trade was a dangerous one so it is a very good way to remember this.

Hilary said...

Very cool. I love when towns depict their history in murals. You've documented this wonderfully.

Sallie (FullTime-Life) said...

Boy that was one hard job back then.... Not that logging today is a piece of cake or anything, but oh my to think of how hard people lived back then! A lovely mural and one of my favorite ways to learn the history of an area.

Revrunner said...

Educational as it is decorative.

Rose said...

This is a fantastic mural...it is one the best I have ever seen and one I really love. Love the feel of history about it.

cieldequimper said...

That looks so real, it's absolutely great!

Linda W. said...

That's a really cool mural. The logs look almost 3-D.

eileeninmd said...

What a fantastic mural, wonderful details. Have a happy new week!

Halcyon said...

A really nice mural. I like it when they tell a story or show something of history.

Sylvia K said...

A fantastic mural it is indeed!! You do find the most terrific things/places to photograph and I'm SO glad you share them with us!! Hope you have a great new week! Enjoy!!

Fun60 said...

What an interesting mural.

William Kendall said...

A beautiful mural! It has a very strong three dimensional feel to it.

Klara said...

what a beautiful mural!

TexWisGirl said...

really nice!!

D.Nambiar said...

That is so WOW!! That's all I can say.
The men and the horses are life size, I presume.
Thank you for sharing this sight with us. It's great!!

RedPat said...

I always like those historical murals and this is a good one, EG!

carol l mckenna said...

Wonderful mural and fascinating history ~ Great shots!

Happy Week to you,
artmusedog and carol

A Quiet Corner said...

Great photos of this historic mural...hope it is preserved!...:)

Photo Cache said...

The mural is well done. I really like this one.

mick said...

Interesting photos - those old timers certainly had to work hard!

diane b said...

You mural guys sure find interesting murals to show and tell about . This is a super one with a great story.

Stephanie said...

Nice work!

Kay said...

That's a great mural and interesting history. Our region has a long history of logging though the hauling was done via the railroad, which had many spurs into areas that were actively logged. There were mills all through the region.

llandudnopictures said...

Love the 3d effect, very impressive!

Yogi♪♪♪ said...

That is a beautiful and historic mural.

Sami said...

Quite a beautiful mural! Thanks for your visit to my blog too Camera Girl.

orvokki said...

Waude, this is fantastic mural !!!

Taken For Granted said...

What a great mural. I'll bet the most common trees to be cut were American chestnuts, a tree which no longer exist in American or Canadian forests.

Anvilcloud said...

What a super mural and a very good, descriptive post too.

Pat Tillett said...

Nice find! It is a great mural and really has some 3-D in it.

Nancy Chan said...

The painting is very, very beautiful!

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East Gwillimbury is a rural town less than an hour north of Toronto, Canada's largest city. My family calls me CameraGirl because I take my camera with me wherever I go.