Monday, January 23, 2012

Grain Elevator/ Our World

 Sealed tight!

This abandoned grain elevator stands beside railroad tracks just outside Pontypool, Ontario.

 A reminder of Pontypool's agricultural history

Built in 1918, this is one of two freestanding grain elevators still standing in Ontario.

Missing more than a few shingles

Canadian Pacific Railway has donated the building to the Friends of the Pontypool Elevator heritage group, which hopes to restore the building and have it declared a historic site.

Structurally it is still sound

The Friends would like to convert the building into a tourist information centre as well as a museum to celebrate the area's history.

Added later: Pontypool is named after Pontypool, Wales.

Click  HERE to see tons more photos about Our World.

51 comments:

Jill said...

I love this! It has so much character and I don't get to see sites like this!

Lowell said...

Pontypool?

I hope that the Friends are able to get their dreams to come true. It would make a great museum.

It's fun to imagine back when this was new and what it looked like and what it meant to the community.

But old, abandoned grain elevators can be something of a menace. Don't they tend to blow up?

Roan said...

I'm a big fan of those historical societies responsible for restoring the old and forgotten buildings. This one is certainly worthy.

Sandra said...

i hope they get it restored, it is a lovely old building and i think we need to save what we can of our history. in Europe they buildings are hundreds and thousands of years old, here in the states we just tear down and rebuild. wrong wrong wrong

Kate said...

It always is a wise decision to preserve part of a community's history, and I hope that the effort to preserve it succeeds!

aka Penelope said...

Nice that the CPR donated the building to the Pontypool Elevator Heritage Group. Hopefully they also contributed a little cash to get them started with the restorations. These buildings, like old barns in the west, are unique but all too often discarded … despite the past giving meaning to the present. Now I’m curious about where Pontypool got its name. :)

TexWisGirl said...

it is a great building! glad they're trying to restore it!

hannah said...

Did you get a chance to look inside?
I'd love to see the wooden structures for raising the grain. This will be a gem when they restore it.

Paul in Powell River said...

Well, I didn't know Ontario had any of these left at all, much less two still standing. I like the second shot best.

ladyfi said...

Oh, what rural beauty you've captured!

Martha Z said...

I hope they succeed, it is an interesting piece of history.

Halcyon said...

I hoe they succeed. It would be a wonderful spot for a visitors center. And I bet there's tons of history!

RedPat said...

What a wonderful structure!

George said...

I haven't seen a grain elevator like this before. I hope the preservation effort succeeds. I like the character of this building.

Judy said...

Such an interesting building! It would be a shame to tear it down if is still sound!

lisa said...

What a wonderful old structure this is, and you have photographed it beautifully.

Gill - That British Woman said...

I have never heard of Pontypool only in Wales. Need to look this up on a map. Great shots though.

Gill

Carver said...

I'm glad there are plans to restore it. I love old structures like this that are preserved after they stop being used for their original purpose.

Sylvia K said...

Oh, I'm glad there are plans to restore it, too! Wonderful when we can save such historical places for future generations! Terrific captures for the day as always, EG! Enjoy your day!

Sylvia

Gary said...

Before the opening of the west, Ontario grew supplied the wheat for what was then the Canadas. Hope it gets turned into museum. Boom & Gary of the Vermilon River, Canada.

Postcards from Wildwood said...

Your photos are beautiful - very atmospheric. I'm so pleased to hear that this gorgeous old building has a chance for a new lease of life. It's such a symbol of the farming history of the area.

Cheri said...

Wonderful old building - so glad it will be saved.

Carolina Mts

Arija said...

A very worthwhile projuct with such a beautiful building.

In Germany often old five and more story mills are converted internally into apartments, thus preserving the heritage aspect of the building and putting it to good use as well. The large spaces of the living quarters coupled with huge beaks and beautiful wooden flooring make them very sought after.

Dianne said...

It's lovely to see a little of the area's history - very unique!

Gemma Wiseman said...

Sounds like a wonderful new life is planned for this impressive icon! But I must admit that I have a soft spot for the art of weathering! A different kind of beauty! These photos are stunning!

Stephanie said...

I love the history you are picking up in your area. Such a nice looking building to use for something else. Love the shots!

NixBlog said...

I certainly hope that it gets restored as it is a very beautiful old building.
Nice shots!

Antonette said...

I'm glad that it's going to get restored. What a wonderful building with so much character.

Lesley said...

I had no idea we had one like this anywhere nearby! Good luck to the Friends of Pontypool. I hope they are successful;.

John "By Stargoose And Hanglands" said...

I've often passed through the Welsh Pont-y-pwl or Pontypool but didn't realise there was one in Ontario. The Welsh one is associated with coal mining rather than agriculture and is famous for producing extremely tough Rugby players.

eileeninmd said...

Great shots and I am so happy they are planning to have it restored. Maybe you can do before and after photos. Have a great day!

NatureFootstep said...

reminds me of when I was a child and we took the grain to the mill. But it was not that high. Thanks for sharing!

La Principessa Errante said...

Whow - a wood grain elevator, absolutely fascinating. Looks like it is in fairly decent shape, but glad to hear it will get some TLC and respect.

Nancy @ A Rural Journal said...

Funny, we actually used to own an abandoned grain elevator some years ago. But that's another story!

This one is fantastic. I'd love to convert it into a house. Great shots!

Jenn Jilks said...

I love these old buildings! Great pots.
Thanks for visiting!

Rose said...

I don't think I have ever seen a grain elevator quite this handsome!

Angie said...

How cool is that?! I hope they are able to restore this lovely old beauty. Great images, EG!

Susan said...

I don't get to see sites like this at all. So cool! I hope it does get restored!

Paulie said...

Wonderul plans for its future!

Randy said...

I love the muted color in that first shot.

Gillian Olson said...

Great pictures and story. I am glad that this character building will be restored and used.

Rajesh said...

Very unique heritage structure. I am happy it has been preserved.

CameraCruise said...

Great shots and story.
It's a beautiful building.

jewaicious said...

What beautiful captures...so much textural content and contrasts.

I like the bit of history, also.

Ebie said...

I hope, too that they are able to save this piece of history. Though I have not seen a grain elevator, I see by its size, it can store a lot.

FotoAnna said...

Love the pictures and the story !
Greetings from Holland,
Anna :-))

see you there! said...

What a great building. Thanks for the info on the name too. Pontypool... fun to say for some reason.

Darla

Powell River Books said...

Flying or driving across the prairies is fun, seeing all the tall grain elevators in the distance. - Margy

Linnea said...

What a beautiful old building; I hope it will be saved from final destruction. Thanks for braving the snow flurries to go out and capture it!

Zosia said...

Lovely building. Hope Friends will manage to restore it and use.

Cezar and Léia said...

Interesting building... I'm wondering what happened once the grains were elevated?
God bless you!
Cezar

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East Gwillimbury is a rural town less than an hour north of Toronto, Canada's largest city. My family calls me CameraGirl because I take my camera with me wherever I go.