Sunday, July 31, 2011

Harvesting Wheat/ Scenic Sunday

Amish farmers 

Looks like yesteryear but this photo was taken a few days ago, four horses pulling an All-Crop harvester originally meant to be pulled by a tractor. The harvester was built between the mid 1930s and the early 1960s - a minimum of half a century ago. The machine is taking in the seed heads and spitting out the straw.

After the farmer who's driving the rig circles his field,  he will position the part that looks a bit like a giraffe over a grain hopper to empty the harvester of the seed heads. Then he will circle his field again to harvest more wheat.

I admire the Amish way of life, seemingly much simpler than our modern ways. But I'd have trouble giving up my camera, computer and blogging.

To see more scenic photos visit  SCENIC SUNDAY.

29 comments:

Zosia said...

I love the colours and the juxtaposition of animals and the machine and the man in the middle as a connector.

Julie said...

I don't see many of those down the end of my street. Love the density of the colour here.

Leif Hagen said...

Such a beautiful, rural scene! Amazing to think how hard the Amish work when easier methods exist! We drove past a black Amish buggy on the way to my parents' house in central Wisconsin yesterday! We're here for a week of Suzuki Violin Institute at UWSP!

greensborodailyphoto.com said...

From the thumbnail, it looks like a giraffe sticking his head out.

Have a great week, WOW!

Kate said...

A very thought provoking image. How many of us could incorporate their way of life as our life style. I like idea of simplicity but wonder about the isolation from modern society. I'm surprised that more of their youngsters don't rebel. The photo and your explanation is excellent.

Roan said...

I love seeing the Amish way of life, and think it would be a good way to live, but I'm with you, I couldn't give up my camera or computer. Wonderful shot!

Sandra said...

I would like a combination of Amish and our ways. the simple life is great but i want electricity and all the things it runs.

TexWisGirl said...

what a great shot. i don't think i'd be good at that hard life - knowing there were 'easier' ways to accomplish things. but i admire their fortitude and faith.

cieldequimper said...

Though some things about these communities makes me very uncomfortable but I love how photogenic they are.

Elisa said...

It´s an old fashioned way of working the champs, but it works very well indeed.
Have a nice Sunday
Elisa, Argentina

Lois Evensen said...

Great subject matter for this beautiful picture. This is one to frame and hang.

Jama said...

Amazing that they can still survive such a life, I don't think I can even survive without the electricity and modern gadgets.

Tanya said...

i love seeing work done the old fashioned way. i've heard that they allow amish children a year off to do whatever they want and almost all come back to the amish way of life. i guess it's just what you know!

beautiful image!

Birdman said...

I'd agree... no one takes my camera!

see you there! said...

It is nice to have a community that is still using the oldfashioned methods so that the rest of us get a peek at the good old days.

Darla

Ruth's Photo Blog said...

Fascinating image.I am with you,I do not want to give up on technology,it's too much fun.

Kathy said...

And your microwave and your washer and dryer and your car and your ...

Great shot though. I wonder how long their culture will continue to survive.

Jacob said...

What a fantastic photo...like a time warp! Great job, EG.

Many times I yearn for a simpler way of life - but I don't think the Amish way is the only alternative.

We must get rid of the idea that "growth" is good. It is killing us. And our planet. And everything on our planet. That would be a good place to start.

Re your comment about the "unbalanced." I think you might be right. In the U.S. we call such people Republicans. :-)

lisa said...

This does look like a much older photograph, and it's beautiful!

Happy Sunday to you!

Wren said...

If only we could shed only the parts of technology and civilization that are irksome, and keep the rest.

I also had drummed into my head from an early age how hard the work of farming is. My mom grew up on a farm, and while she didn't plow the fields behind a team of horses, she did have to haul water from the well, feed the chickens, slop the hogs, and work in the garden. I'm thinking the traffic jam between me and the supermarket is bearable in comparison. :)

RedPat said...

A blast from the past! I too couldn't give up my techie stuff.

Janie said...

What a great capture of a way of life that's long gone in most places.

Jane said...

This is a fabulous photo and I loved reading about how this farmer works - being English the Amish way of life fascinates me and I hope one day I can visit that part of the country and see some of it for myself. We have just ordered an Amish dining room table - one man in his workshop who just makes tables.

Living In Williamsburg Virginia said...

We saw this a lot where we lived in Pennsylvania and still do when visiting family. It seems like a hard life, yet it has an appeal.

Darryl and Ruth :)

George said...

This is a wonderful photo.

Jack said...

I saw many Amish scenes during my six years in Ohio, but I never got used to it. Choosing to live such a difficult life is tough to understand.

Francisca said...

What a great retro image, EG. There's more than my camera and blog I'd miss living the Amish lifestyle. Let's just start with my world view and stop there... :-)

Admin said...

Horses like dogs are worth-having buddies!

Btw, I'm visiting here for Scenic Sunday. Mine is up here:

http://www.thedtour.info/2011/07/our-humble-fiesta-celebration-july-25th.html

Hope to see you around!

harvest said...

Very natural sight of nature giving the peaceful and calm surrounding..with Harvesting Parts Thank you

Friends who encourage me

Blog Archive

About Me

My photo
East Gwillimbury is a rural town less than an hour north of Toronto, Canada's largest city. My family calls me CameraGirl because I take my camera with me wherever I go.